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Putting your coursework together

You will complete the coursework that is prescribed by your degree granting program and be able to take advantage of the built in flexibility of the integrated common core and distinctive seminar schedules. The table below illustrates how the coursework can fit together and leave plenty of time for your research.

Spring 2017 - Courses for planning1
The IID program is a joint program between Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology (VMP) and the School for Global Animal Health (SGAH).

TimeMondayTuesday 2WednesdayThursday 2Friday
7:10 AM
8:10 AM
9:10 AM563 Deconstruction of Research563 Deconstruction of Research
10:10 AM
11:10 AM
12:10 PM555
1:10 PM
2:10 PM
3:10 PM
4:10 PM
5:10 PM

Cross listed (NEUROSCI)

  • 563 Deconstruction of Research (3 credits) Deconstruction of Research is based on the premise that construction of new scientific knowledge builds from a foundation of primary evidence that requires critical evaluation through active analysis and productive discourse. Students will learn and understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge transmitted through oral and written avenues. Students will learn the necessary skills required for critical analysis of general concepts no matter how familiar or unfamiliar the topic. Dr. Steve Simasko

 

VET_PATH

  • 501 Case-based Learnings in Veterinary Pathology
  • 525 Introductory Readings in Veterinary Pathology
  • 542 Advanced Diagnostic Pathology
  • 545 Mechanisms of Disease
  • 555 Research in Progress Seminar
  • 571 Advanced Topics in Pathology
  • 592 Anatomic Pathology Seminar

Spring 2017 - Courses for planning1

TimeMondayTuesday 2WednesdayThursday 2Friday
7:10 AM
8:10 AM541
9:10 AM541563 Deconstruction of Research563 Deconstruction of Research541
10:10 AM543543543
11:10 AM
12:10 PM590
1:10 PM
2:10 PM
3:10 PM
4:10 PM
5:10 PM

Neuroscience (NEUROSCI)

541 Special Topics in Cellular/Molecular Neuroscience

  • Cell Biology of the Neuron (Weeks 1-5)
    • This course will help students develop ‘big picture’ understanding of intracellular signaling, become familiar with experimental methodologies with attention to experimental design and inclusion of proper controls employed in modern biomedical research. Topics include:  Regulation of gene transcription and protein translation, extracellular and intracellular signaling, plasma membrane receptors, protein and lipid kinases, phosphatases, receptor systems, and cyclic nucleotides-based and calcium-dependent signaling. Dr. Joseph Harding (coordinator) Dr. Michael Varnum
  • Signal Transduction (Weeks 6-10)
    • This course will help students develop ‘big picture’ understanding of intracellular signaling, become familiar with experimental methodologies with attention to experimental design and inclusion of proper controls employed in modern biomedical research. Inositol polyphosphates and diacylglycerol, lipid signaling, metabolites of arachidonic acid, degradation dependent signaling ion channels, gaseous messengers, apoptosis, autophagy, unfolded protein response,  and cell cycle regulation, oncogenes, Cancer, cell adhesion molecules, extracellular matrix, reactive oxygen species cellular aging. Dr. Joseph Harding (coordinator) Dr. Michael Varnum
  • Neuroscience of Sleep (Weeks 11-15)
    • This course will provide an overview of the history of sleep research and the evolution, regulation and function of sleep. It will review current models of sleep regulation, brain circuits underlying sleep and wakefulness and the role of metabolic, endocrine and immune signaling in sleep. The use of various model organisms, circuit mapping and imaging techniques in sleep research will be discussed. Dr. Levente Kapás (coordinator)

543 Special Topics in Behavioral/Clinical Neuroscience

  • Behavioral Neuroscience (Weeks 1-5)
    • This course will help students apply concepts in behavioral neuroscience to the critical evaluation and interpretation of papers from the primary literature; learn which animal models are appropriate to use for the study of particular forms of learning, memory, motivated behavior, emotion and cognitive dysfunction; and become familiar with neural substrates underlying learning, memory, motivated behavior, and emotion. Dr. Rita Fuchs Lokensgard (coordinator), Dr. Ryan McLaughlin
  • Stress: A neurobiological and behavioral perspective (Weeks 6-10)
    • Organisms must adapt to environmental threats to homeostasis to survive. The “stress” response is a coordinated set of brain and body changes that allow for this adaptation. Failure of these stress systems can lead to sub-optimal responses, which over the long term can lead to significant mental and physical health costs. This micro course will explore the historical development of the concept of stress, the cell, circuit, and hormonal underpinnings of the “stress response”, and the costs and consequences of failures of this system. We will explore stress in several taxa, from the cell to the population level, with the overall goal of providing an understanding of the mechanisms involved in maintaining, and protecting, homeostasis, and the consequences of malfunctions in these responses. Dr. Ilia Karatsoreos (coordinator), Dr. Heiko Jansen, Dr. Ryan McLaughlin
  • Feeding: Hypothalamic-Brainstem Interactions (Weeks 11-15)
    • In our brief, but intense, topical examination of the neural control of food intake we will touch on the key concepts and definitions that guide research and understanding in this area, review foundational and formative literature, and discuss current multidisciplinary research that sheds new light on neurophysiological mechanisms that control feeding behavior. Dr. Jon Davis (coordinator), Dr. Robert Ritter, Dr. Suzanne Wayman, Dr. James Peters
  • 563 Deconstruction of Research
    • Deconstruction of Research (3 credits) is based on the premise that construction of new scientific knowledge builds from a foundation of primary evidence that requires critical evaluation through active analysis and productive discourse. Students will learn and understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge transmitted through oral and written avenues. Students will learn the necessary skills required for critical analysis of general concepts no matter how familiar or unfamiliar the topic. Dr. Steve Simasko

590 Seminar

Spring 2017 - Courses for planning1

TimeMondayTuesday 2WednesdayThursday 2Friday
7:10 AM
8:10 AM
9:10 AM525563 Deconstruction of Research & 550525563 Deconstruction of Research & 550
10:10 AM529529529
11:10 AM514514514
12:10 PM
1:10 PM542542542
2:10 PM579
3:10 PM501501501
4:10 PM
5:10 PM

Molecular Biosciences (MBIOS)

501 Cell Biology

514 General Biochemistry

525 Advanced Topics in Genetics

  • Genetically modifying organisms the state of the art (Weeks 1-5)
    • Humans have been genetically modifying plants and animals by selective breeding for centuries. The ability to selectively modify the genome using engineering strategies began in the late 20th century, but has already had a tremendous impact on our daily lives. This mini course focuses on past and current approaches to generate genetically modified models for research and food animals to benefit human health. It will also explore the philosophical, ethical and societalconcerns raised by this rapidly evolving facet of biosciences. Dr. Pat Hunt; Dr. Jon Oatley; Dr. Jennifer Watts
  • Genes, genomes (Weeks 11-15)
    • 2013 marked the 10th anniversary of the sequencing of the human genome and the 60th anniversary of the discovery of the DNA double helix. Advances in genetics (the study of individual genes) and genomics (the study of an entire genome) have fundamentally altered our understanding of biology. This course will focus on current topics in human genetics, exploring the science and discussing the philosophical, ethical and societal concerns raised by recent scientific advances. Dr. Pat Hunt; Dr. Terry Hassold

529 Selected Topics in Cell Biology

  • Cytoskeleton (Weeks 1-5)
    • Recent advances in microscopy of live cells and state-of-the-art molecular tools have changed our concepts of how cells work and how the dynamics of their components contribute to cell and tissue phenotypes and diseases. This course focuses on two contemporary topics in “Cytoskeleton” and “Membrane biogenesis and intracellular trafficking” in the eukaryotic cell using a combination of lecture format and reading of pertinent, current literature. Dr. Kwanhee Kim and Dr. Jonathan Jones

542 General Virology

548 Selected Topics in Immunology & Virology

549 Seminar in Immunology

550 Microbial Physiology

563 Deconstruction of Research

  • Deconstruction of Research (3 credits) is based on the premise that construction of new scientific knowledge builds from a foundation of primary evidence that requires critical evaluation through active analysis and productive discourse. Students will learn and understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge transmitted through oral and written avenues. Students will learn the necessary skills required for critical analysis of general concepts no matter how familiar or unfamiliar the topic. Dr. Steve Simasko

579 Molecular Biosciences Seminar

Molecular Biosciences Graduate Program Handbook & Students Learning Outcomes

Spring 2017 - Courses for planning1

TimeMondayTuesday 2WednesdayThursday 2Friday
7:10 AM
8:10 AM582
9:10 AM563 Deconstruction of Research 563 Deconstruction of Research
10:10 AM
11:10 AM
12:10 PM
1:10 PM
2:10 PM
3:10 PM
4:10 PM
5:10 PM

Cross listed (NEUROSCI)

  • 563 Deconstruction of Research
    • Deconstruction of Research (3 credits) is based on the premise that construction of new scientific knowledge builds from a foundation of primary evidence that requires critical evaluation through active analysis and productive discourse. Students will learn and understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge transmitted through oral and written avenues. Students will learn the necessary skills required for critical analysis of general concepts no matter how familiar or unfamiliar the topic. Dr. Steve Simasko

VET_CLIN

  • 565 Oncology Journal Seminar
  • 570 Special Topics
  • 574 Cardiology Special Topics
  • 576 Introduction to Veterinary Clinical Research
  • 579 Oncology Rounds Seminar
  • 580 Advanced Clinical Pathology
  • 582 Seminar in Clinical Medicine
  • 584 Comparative Theriogenology
  • 585 Selected Topics in Advanced Clinical Neurology
  • 587 Hospital Rotation
  • 589 Advanced Clinical Veterinary Medicine
  • 590 Special Topics in Equine Medicine
  • 591 Advanced Clinical Diagnosis
  • 593 Anesthesia Seminar
  • 596 Advanced Radiology
  • 597 Diagnosis and Treatment of Surgically Correctable Soft Tissue Diseases in Small Animals
  • 598 Surgery Residents Seminar
1 Current students should consult with the department for advising and for the Graduate Student Handbook.
2 Tuesday & Thursday courses are generally 75 minutes long. See schedule of courses for times
For a complete list of courses and descriptions offered by term, see the schedule of courses. For a complete list of courses, see the University Catalog.